The difference between PDAF and DAP

The difference between PDAF and DAP

 

Oct. 25, 2013

The Editor

Philippine Daily Inquirer

 

Dear Editor:

 

          In his column of Oct. 25, 2013, titled “Conspiracy theories”, Mr. Amando Doronila failed to make an important distinction between the Priority Assistance Development Fund (PDAF) and the Development Accelerated Program (DAP), which is what really concerns the public.

  

          Billions of PDAF or “pork barrel funds”, which were intended for public projects and services, were allegedly stolen or pocketed by private persons through fake NGOs (nongovernment organizations) with the connivance of certain senators and congressmen who also allegedly benefited from the scam.  Some or all of them (in the Napoles cases) have been formally accused of “plunder” by the Department of Justice before the Ombudsman.

 

          On the other hand, there is no allegation either by Senator Jinggoy Estrada, who first “exposed” the DAP in a Senate privilege speech, nor by former Senator Joker Arroyo, that the P50 million in DAP funds which were released for public projects upon the advice of certain senators or congressmen were stolen or pocketed by them. 

 

          Estrada had called the DAP funds a “bribe” to legislators who actively supported the impeachment of former Chef Justice Renato Corona.  But he did not assert  that the money went to the pockets of the legislators, or to persons not authorized by law.   The Department of Budget and Management (DBM) affirms that the money was spent for public projects and services designated by the legislators concerned. 

 

           Senator Arroyo, whose hands had never been greased by pork barrel funds, admitted that he had requested for the release of P47 million by DBM for the building of classrooms in Iriga and Baao, Camarines Sur, which cost P10 million each, and for medical aid to indigent patients at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, the Lung Center of the Philippines, the Philippine Heart Center, and the Bicol Medical Center in Naga.

 

          Arroyo did not complain that the DAP funds which were released on his advice did not go to the institutions which he had designated.  Neither is there any allegation or suspicion that any of these P47 million DAP funds ended in the pockets of Joker, who would not even receive the allowances intended for the maintenance of his Senate office.  We can assume that the money was spent as Joker advised it to be. 

 

          What Joker was complaining about was that the funds from the DAP came from “savings” which he claimed could not be disbursed by the Executive without an appropriation by Congress.  He therefore believes that the DAP is unconstitutional, to which the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) disagrees.  Now that is an issue that still has to be settled by the Supreme Court.

 

          This difference is what President Aquino – in his speech before the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines – meant when he said the media should “keep their eyes on the ball.”  The “ball”, insofar as the public is concerned, are the billions of PDAF funds which were misappropriated for private use.  It is a criminal matter.  The public  wants it prosecuted as fast as possible and the guilty parties sent to jail for plunder.

 

          The DAP is solely a constitutional issue, barring any suggestion or complaint that it was used to cover up the theft or malversation of public funds.  The PDAF may also be raised as a constitutional issue on the ground that the appropriation of public funds is a collective congressional decision, and should not be left to the individual discretion of legislators.  

 

          However, the President is right to be worried that certain quarters are deliberately confusing the issues in order to divert the public’s attention to another ball game. Further, the new ball game has him on its sights. 

 

 

MANUEL F. ALMARIO

Spokesman, Movement for Truth in History

(Email, mfalmario@yahoo.com)

 

The difference between PDAF and DAP

 

Oct. 25, 2013

The Editor

Philippine Daily Inquirer

 

Dear Editor:

 

          In his column of Oct. 25, 2013, titled “Conspiracy theories”, Mr. Amando Doronila failed to make an important distinction between the Priority Assistance Development Fund (PDAF) and the Development Accelerated Program (DAP), which is what really concerns the public.

  

          Billions of PDAF or “pork barrel funds”, which were intended for public projects and services, were allegedly stolen or pocketed by private persons through fake NGOs (nongovernment organizations) with the connivance of certain senators and congressmen who also allegedly benefited from the scam.  Some or all of them (in the Napoles cases) have been formally accused of “plunder” by the Department of Justice before the Ombudsman.

 

          On the other hand, there is no allegation either by Senator Jinggoy Estrada, who first “exposed” the DAP in a Senate privilege speech, nor by former Senator Joker Arroyo, that the P50 million in DAP funds which were released for public projects upon the advice of certain senators or congressmen were stolen or pocketed by them. 

 

          Estrada had called the DAP funds a “bribe” to legislators who actively supported the impeachment of former Chef Justice Renato Corona.  But he did not assert  that the money went to the pockets of the legislators, or to persons not authorized by law.   The Department of Budget and Management (DBM) affirms that the money was spent for public projects and services designated by the legislators concerned. 

 

           Senator Arroyo, whose hands had never been greased by pork barrel funds, admitted that he had requested for the release of P47 million by DBM for the building of classrooms in Iriga and Baao, Camarines Sur, which cost P10 million each, and for medical aid to indigent patients at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, the Lung Center of the Philippines, the Philippine Heart Center, and the Bicol Medical Center in Naga.

 

          Arroyo did not complain that the DAP funds which were released on his advice did not go to the institutions which he had designated.  Neither is there any allegation or suspicion that any of these P47 million DAP funds ended in the pockets of Joker, who would not even receive the allowances intended for the maintenance of his Senate office.  We can assume that the money was spent as Joker advised it to be. 

 

          What Joker was complaining about was that the funds from the DAP came from “savings” which he claimed could not be disbursed by the Executive without an appropriation by Congress.  He therefore believes that the DAP is unconstitutional, to which the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) disagrees.  Now that is an issue that still has to be settled by the Supreme Court.

 

          This difference is what President Aquino – in his speech before the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines – meant when he said the media should “keep their eyes on the ball.”  The “ball”, insofar as the public is concerned, are the billions of PDAF funds which were misappropriated for private use.  It is a criminal matter.  The public  wants it prosecuted as fast as possible and the guilty parties sent to jail for plunder.

 

          The DAP is solely a constitutional issue, barring any suggestion or complaint that it was used to cover up the theft or malversation of public funds.  The PDAF may also be raised as a constitutional issue on the ground that the appropriation of public funds is a collective congressional decision, and should not be left to the individual discretion of legislators.  

 

          However, the President is right to be worried that certain quarters are deliberately confusing the issues in order to divert the public’s attention to another ball game. Further, the new ball game has him on its sights. 

 

 

MANUEL F. ALMARIO

Spokesman, Movement for Truth in History

(Email, mfalmario@yahoo.com)

The difference between PDAF and DAP

 

Oct. 25, 2013

The Editor

Philippine Daily Inquirer

 

Dear Editor:

 

          In his column of Oct. 25, 2013, titled “Conspiracy theories”, Mr. Amando Doronila failed to make an important distinction between the Priority Assistance Development Fund (PDAF) and the Development Accelerated Program (DAP), which is what really concerns the public.

  

          Billions of PDAF or “pork barrel funds”, which were intended for public projects and services, were allegedly stolen or pocketed by private persons through fake NGOs (nongovernment organizations) with the connivance of certain senators and congressmen who also allegedly benefited from the scam.  Some or all of them (in the Napoles cases) have been formally accused of “plunder” by the Department of Justice before the Ombudsman.

 

          On the other hand, there is no allegation either by Senator Jinggoy Estrada, who first “exposed” the DAP in a Senate privilege speech, nor by former Senator Joker Arroyo, that the P50 million in DAP funds which were released for public projects upon the advice of certain senators or congressmen were stolen or pocketed by them. 

 

          Estrada had called the DAP funds a “bribe” to legislators who actively supported the impeachment of former Chef Justice Renato Corona.  But he did not assert  that the money went to the pockets of the legislators, or to persons not authorized by law.   The Department of Budget and Management (DBM) affirms that the money was spent for public projects and services designated by the legislators concerned. 

 

           Senator Arroyo, whose hands had never been greased by pork barrel funds, admitted that he had requested for the release of P47 million by DBM for the building of classrooms in Iriga and Baao, Camarines Sur, which cost P10 million each, and for medical aid to indigent patients at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, the Lung Center of the Philippines, the Philippine Heart Center, and the Bicol Medical Center in Naga.

 

          Arroyo did not complain that the DAP funds which were released on his advice did not go to the institutions which he had designated.  Neither is there any allegation or suspicion that any of these P47 million DAP funds ended in the pockets of Joker, who would not even receive the allowances intended for the maintenance of his Senate office.  We can assume that the money was spent as Joker advised it to be. 

 

          What Joker was complaining about was that the funds from the DAP came from “savings” which he claimed could not be disbursed by the Executive without an appropriation by Congress.  He therefore believes that the DAP is unconstitutional, to which the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) disagrees.  Now that is an issue that still has to be settled by the Supreme Court.

 

          This difference is what President Aquino – in his speech before the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines – meant when he said the media should “keep their eyes on the ball.”  The “ball”, insofar as the public is concerned, are the billions of PDAF funds which were misappropriated for private use.  It is a criminal matter.  The public  wants it prosecuted as fast as possible and the guilty parties sent to jail for plunder.

 

          The DAP is solely a constitutional issue, barring any suggestion or complaint that it was used to cover up the theft or malversation of public funds.  The PDAF may also be raised as a constitutional issue on the ground that the appropriation of public funds is a collective congressional decision, and should not be left to the individual discretion of legislators.  

 

          However, the President is right to be worried that certain quarters are deliberately confusing the issues in order to divert the public’s attention to another ball game. Further, the new ball game has him on its sights. 

 

 

MANUEL F. ALMARIO

Spokesman, Movement for Truth in History

(Email, mfalmario@yahoo.com)

 

The difference between PDAF and DAP

 

Oct. 25, 2013

The Editor

Philippine Daily Inquirer

 

Dear Editor:

 

          In his column of Oct. 25, 2013, titled “Conspiracy theories”, Mr. Amando Doronila failed to make an important distinction between the Priority Assistance Development Fund (PDAF) and the Development Accelerated Program (DAP), which is what really concerns the public.

  

          Billions of PDAF or “pork barrel funds”, which were intended for public projects and services, were allegedly stolen or pocketed by private persons through fake NGOs (nongovernment organizations) with the connivance of certain senators and congressmen who also allegedly benefited from the scam.  Some or all of them (in the Napoles cases) have been formally accused of “plunder” by the Department of Justice before the Ombudsman.

 

          On the other hand, there is no allegation either by Senator Jinggoy Estrada, who first “exposed” the DAP in a Senate privilege speech, nor by former Senator Joker Arroyo, that the P50 million in DAP funds which were released for public projects upon the advice of certain senators or congressmen were stolen or pocketed by them. 

 

          Estrada had called the DAP funds a “bribe” to legislators who actively supported the impeachment of former Chef Justice Renato Corona.  But he did not assert  that the money went to the pockets of the legislators, or to persons not authorized by law.   The Department of Budget and Management (DBM) affirms that the money was spent for public projects and services designated by the legislators concerned. 

 

           Senator Arroyo, whose hands had never been greased by pork barrel funds, admitted that he had requested for the release of P47 million by DBM for the building of classrooms in Iriga and Baao, Camarines Sur, which cost P10 million each, and for medical aid to indigent patients at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, the Lung Center of the Philippines, the Philippine Heart Center, and the Bicol Medical Center in Naga.

 

          Arroyo did not complain that the DAP funds which were released on his advice did not go to the institutions which he had designated.  Neither is there any allegation or suspicion that any of these P47 million DAP funds ended in the pockets of Joker, who would not even receive the allowances intended for the maintenance of his Senate office.  We can assume that the money was spent as Joker advised it to be. 

 

          What Joker was complaining about was that the funds from the DAP came from “savings” which he claimed could not be disbursed by the Executive without an appropriation by Congress.  He therefore believes that the DAP is unconstitutional, to which the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) disagrees.  Now that is an issue that still has to be settled by the Supreme Court.

 

          This difference is what President Aquino – in his speech before the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines – meant when he said the media should “keep their eyes on the ball.”  The “ball”, insofar as the public is concerned, are the billions of PDAF funds which were misappropriated for private use.  It is a criminal matter.  The public  wants it prosecuted as fast as possible and the guilty parties sent to jail for plunder.

 

          The DAP is solely a constitutional issue, barring any suggestion or complaint that it was used to cover up the theft or malversation of public funds.  The PDAF may also be raised as a constitutional issue on the ground that the appropriation of public funds is a collective congressional decision, and should not be left to the individual discretion of legislators.  

 

          However, the President is right to be worried that certain quarters are deliberately confusing the issues in order to divert the public’s attention to another ball game. Further, the new ball game has him on its sights. 

 

 

MANUEL F. ALMARIO

Spokesman, Movement for Truth in History

(Email, mfalmario@yahoo.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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